We've updated our Terms of Use. You can review the changes here.

El fabuloso sonido de Andrés Vargas Pinedo: una colección de música popular amazónica (1966​-​1974)

by Andrés Vargas Pinedo

/
  • Record/Vinyl + Digital Album

    Includes insert with photos and extensive information in Spanish and English. Edition of 300 copies.

    Includes unlimited streaming of El fabuloso sonido de Andrés Vargas Pinedo: una colección de música popular amazónica (1966-1974) via the free Bandcamp app, plus high-quality download in MP3, FLAC and more.
    ships out within 7 days

      $24 USD or more 

     

  • Streaming + Download

    Includes unlimited streaming via the free Bandcamp app, plus high-quality download in MP3, FLAC and more.
    Purchasable with gift card

      $9 USD  or more

     

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.

about

THE FABULOUS SOUND OF ANDRÉS VARGAS PINEDO
A collection of Amazonian popular music (1966-1974)

Buh Records is pleased to present the first compilation of the icon of Amazonian popular music, Andrés Vargas Pinedo.

Andrés Vargas Pinedo is an prominent composer of Amazonian popular music from Peru. He is blind, and has excelled as a player of the quena and the violin. He was born in the city of Yurimaguas but he developed as an artist in Lima, for thirty years he has worked as a traveling musician on a street in the San Isidro district of Lima. Throughout his career, he has formed and joined various popular music groups. This compilation presents fifteen songs of his authorship, belonging to his first two groups: Conjunto típico Corazón de la Selva and Los Pihuichos de la selva, active between 1965 and 1974, and which helped define the sound of Amazonian popular music.
These years saw the emergence of an Amazonian popular music movement led by Vargas Pinedo as well as groups such as Los Solteritos, Flor del Oriente or Selva Alegre. These artists based their music on the rhythms of the Amazonian folklore (pandilla, sitaracuy, movido, cajada, chimayche) and were nourished by influences from the coast and the highlands of Peru, as well as by the tropical rhythms of Brazil, Colombia and Ecuador, achieving a musical synthesis that is an invitation to collective celebration and endless dance. A sound that is defined by a constant and hypnotic rhythmic base of kick and snare drums, upon which the quena and violin develop imaginative melodic lines. Sometimes there is a singing voice, sometimes the voices playfully appear as sounds that identify Amazonian popular speech or that emulate jungle animals. The fifteen tracks gathered in The fabulous sound of Andrés Vargas Pinedo: A collection of Amazonian popular music (1966-1974) are a good introduction to the work of an essential creator of Peruvian music, whose sound expresses the spirit of the Amazonian people and summarizes the transition from tradition to the popular in the context of the emergence of a record industry of Amazonian music. Andrés Vargas constitutes a fundamental basis for the music of the Amazon, as his work synthesizes diverse influences, having that original root as its main motive. This compilation is presented in vinyl format and includes a brochure with extensive information and photos. The audio has been remastered directly from the original tapes. Edition of 300 copies. Art by Jordy García (Blumoo Posters).
Beneficiary project of the Economic Stimuli for Culture of the Ministry of Culture of Peru


EL FABULOSO SONIDO DE ANDRES VARGAS PINEDO
Una colección de música popular amazónica (1966-1974)

Andrés Vargas Pinedo es un importante compositor de música popular amazónica de Perú. Es invidente, y se ha destacado como intérprete de la quena y el violín. Nació en la ciudad de Yurimaguas, pero se desarrolló como artista en Lima. Desde hace treinta años trabaja como músico ambulante en una calle del distrito limeño de San Isidro. A lo largo de su trayectoria ha formado e integrado diversos conjuntos de música popular. Esta compilación presenta quince canciones de su autoría, pertenecientes a sus dos primeras agrupaciones: Conjunto Típico Corazón de la selva y Los Pihuichos de la selva, activas entre 1965 y 1974, y que ayudaron a definir el sonido de la música popular amazónica.
En esos años surgió un movimiento de música popular amazónica, donde también destacaron agrupaciones como Los Solteritos, Flor del Oriente o Selva Alegre, quienes a partir de una base de ritmos del folclore amazónico (pandilla, sitaracuy, movido, cajada, chimayche) y nutrido de influencias de músicas de la costa y la sierra peruana, como de ritmos tropicales de Brasil, Colombia y Ecuador, lograron una síntesis musical que es una invitación a la celebración colectiva y la danza sin fin. Un sonido que está definido por una base rítmica constante e hipnótica de bombo y redoblantes, sobre el cual la quena y el violín desarrollan imaginativas líneas melódicas. A veces hay una voz que canta, a veces las voces aparecen lúdicamente como sonidos que identifican el habla popular amazónica o que emulan animales de la selva. Los quince temas reunidos en este álbum son una buena introducción a la obra de un creador esencial para la música peruana, cuyo sonido expresa el espíritu del pueblo amazónico y resume ese paso de la tradición hacia lo popular en el contexto del surgimiento de una industria discográfica de las músicas populares amazónicas. Andrés Vargas constituye una base fundamental para la música de la Amazonía, es música que sintetiza influencias diversas teniendo esa raíz originaria como su principal motivo. Esta compilación es presentada en formato de vinilo e incluye folleto con amplia información y fotos. El audio ha sido remasterizado directamente de las cintas matrices. Edición limitada de 300 copias. Arte por Jordy García (Posters Blumoo).

Proyecto beneficiario de los Estímulos Económicos para la Cultura del Ministerio de Cultura del Perú

---------------

ANDRÉS VARGAS PINEDO AND AMAZONIAN POPULAR MUSIC

Andrés Vargas Pinedo is an important composer of Amazonian popular music from Peru. He is blind, and has excelled as a player of the quena and the violin. He was born in the city of Yurimaguas. Throughout his career, he has formed and joined various popular music groups. This compilation presents fifteen songs of his authorship, belonging to his first two groups: Conjunto Típico Corazón de la Selva and Los Pihuichos de la Selva, active between 1965 and 1974, and which helped define the sound of Amazonian popular music.

Starting in the 1950s, traditional music from the various regions of Peru made their entry into the world of records. Progressively, and as a consequence of an intense migratory flow to the capital, a market for recorded music with various folkloric musical expressions began to take shape in Lima, which quickly topped the list of best sellers, by a wide difference, compared to other musical genres. By the 1970s there were about 3,000 published titles of folk genres. (1) This generated not a few consequences within traditional music itself. Among the most notorious, the fact that it shifted from compositions by anonymous authors, transmitted orally, to the emergence of composers and authors with registered music, and performed by professional ensembles which were now reaching great popularity nationally. The music that was played in specific rural contexts now circulated through commercial recordings and radio broadcasts, adapting to the formats that the recording industry determined (2 or 3-minute songs). Although Andean music was the main engine of this new industry, there was also space for the distribution of music that came from the Peruvian Amazon.

The universe of traditional Amazonian music includes genres which are practiced by native communities for ritual purposes, as well as the traditional mestizo Amazonian music that is linked to the dances featured in festivities such as the Fiesta de San Juan, the Carnivals and the Danza de la Humisha. These festivities attract many tourists: they are massive dances full of mischief, that arise spontaneously and that transform the streets into a space of revelry. The sitaracuy [ant that bites] and especially the pandilla [gang] are the most representative dances of the Amazonian region (2), but we also find genres such as the movido, the cajada, the chimayche, the changanacuy, the bombo baile, all associated with the festivities. Each dance has its specificities according to the city in which it is practiced. The music is performed by groups made up almost always of an instrumental base of quena or fife, bass drum and snare drum; sometimes a clarinet, a violin and a guitar are added. Although each dance has its own rhythmic variations, they have in common that the bass drum marks a constant rhythm, on which the quena or the fife develops a very high-pitched and repetitive melodic line that seems to imitate the song of a bird. Sometimes there is a singing voice, sometimes the voices playfully appear as sounds that identify Amazonian popular speech or that emulate jungle animals. These dances are practiced by the riverside people and come mainly from the High Forest, which borders the mountains, hence it is music that has received a strong influence from the Andean world.

On the other hand, we can also find in the region a very varied development of popular music that includes waltzes, marches, children's music, cumbias, rock and roll and also the music performed by typical ensembles which, based on the traditional Amazonian ensemble, and nourished by musical influences from Brazil (samba), Colombia (cumbia) and Ecuador (sanjuanito), have produced a new Amazonian musical repertoire since the 60s. Groups such as Conjunto Típico Corazón de la Selva, Los Solteritos, Los Pihuichos de la Selva, Los Guacamayos, Conjunto Selva Alegre and Conjunto Flor del Oriente are those that defined the sound of the Amazonian popular music movement, to which other groups were later added, such as Los Hijos de Lamas, Jibarito y Los Mensajeros de la Selva, Los Ribereños del Huallaga, among others.

This popular Amazonian music is linked to feelings of local identity and narrates experiences related to forms of work, migration, love stories and popular legends, Amazonian landscapes and typical food.
Andrés Vargas Pinedo occupies an important place in this musical universe, due to the presence in his compositions of deep-rooted traditions, his unique style of playing the quena and his pioneering quality. “Corazón de la selva”, the first LP of the Conjunto Típico Corazón de la Selva, by Andrés Vargas Pinedo, was published by Industrias El Virrey in April 1966 and constitutes the first recorded example of this popular Amazonian music.

Andrés Vargas Pinedo was born on September 23, 1943 in Yurimaguas, Alto Amazonas, Loreto. He became blind when he was three days old due to medical negligence. He learned to play the quena at age 9, and grew up listening to Roldán Pinedo, Ángel Carbajal and Juan Eleazer Huanchi “El Yacuruna”, traditional musicians who played at town parties. At the age of 20 he moved to Iquitos and there he formed his first musical ensemble. Radio broadcasts played an important role in promoting an artist, and Vargas Pinedo’s music was featured on programs such as “Cantares Amazónicos” on Radio Amazonas, directed by Tito Rodríguez Linares “El Shicshi”, and “Cantares de la Selva” on Radio Loreto, directed by Raúl Llerena Vásquez (Ranil) and Alejandro Vásquez Pérez. In this way, his music reached a larger audience, including the ears of the mayor, who hired the group to perform in various squares of the city. As the group started to enjoy a greater acceptance, they decided to try their luck in Lima. By then they were already called Corazón de la Selva, and the group was made up of Andrés Vargas (quena and composition), Horacio Fernández (guitar), Alberto del Castillo (charango), Horacio Fernández Reátegui (maracas), Roberto Alaba Meléndez (bass drum), Gilberto Villacrés Reátegui (first drummer), Esteban de la Cruz (second drummer), Palmira and Francisca Camasca Tihuay (first and second voice, respectively).

Don Andrés maintains that the name Corazón de la Selva was given by Elíseo Reátegui, a prominent composer and leader of Los Solteritos, who named them that way during one of his shows. (3) For his part, Víctor del Águila, the notable violinist of the group's second album, suggests that the name was given by Manuel Horacio Fernández, who one day, after going in search of firewood, came across a huacapurana trunk, which at the first blow made a liquid similar to blood gush out, and from there arose the idea for the name of the group. (4)
The truth is that Corazón de la Selva began a dizzying musical career. Thanks to the promoter Delfín Linares, they arrived in Lima for a presentation on Radio Agricultura, which reached the ears of Polidorio García, the director of El Virrey [a well-known Peruvian music label], who offered to publish an album. Within a few days, they were recording their first album, using the Cine Coloso [a movie theater], in La Victoria, as a recording studio. César Zárate, from the Andean group Los Pacharacos, joined them on the violin. In April 1966, the LP “Corazón de la Selva” was released, which the record company presented as “the synthesis of our Amazon rainforest” and which included twelve songs composed by Vargas Pinedo. Many of these songs show a great influence of musical genres from the Andean region, as well as from the Peruvian coast, while others are based on the traditional Amazonian sound, such as “Alegría de la selva”, inspired by the chirping of a pájaro flautero [a bird species whose call is similar in timbre to the sound of a flute], in the rhythm of movido, “Uchpagallo”, in the rhythm of sitaracuy, inspired by a traditional melody, or “Punchacacho tutacacho”, in the rhythm of changanacuy, all of which are already classics of Amazonian music.

After a year of successful tours and concerts throughout the Amazon region, the group began to record their second album on October 3, 1968. The same day that General Juan Velasco Alvarado carried out a coup that deposed President Fernando Belaunde Terry, thus marking the end of an oligarchic state that had dominated Peru, and beginning the Revolutionary Government of the Armed Forces, which brought with it a series of historically pending reforms in favor of the great majorities. Through a series of radio broadcasting decrees, the nationalist cultural policy of the new administration contributed greatly to the promotion of indigenous popular music.

“Picaflor Loretano”, the new album by the Conjunto Típico Corazón de la Selva, was recorded in Iquitos, at the Radio Atlántida auditorium, under the supervision of Fredy Centti (director of Los Pacharacos and head of the folklore department at El Virrey) and Raúl Delmar (producer and artistic director of El Virrey). For this second album the group was made up of Andrés Vargas Pinedo (quena), Manuel Horacio Fernández (guitar), Victor del Águila (violin), Gilberto Villacrés (first drummer), Esteban de la Cruz (second drummer), Roberto Alaba Meléndez (bass drum), Neptalí Angulo (cavaquinho), Fernando Fernández Reátegui (güiro) and Palmira Camasca (vocals). Francisca was no longer part of the group, although she contributed backing vocals for the recording. That same day, also at the facilities of Radio Atlántida, Eliseo Reátegui and Los Solteritos made their second recording, "El amanecer de Los Solteritos" for El Virrey.

"Picaflor Loretano" was recorded with some technical difficulties. Consequently, the sound did not reach the brilliance of the debut album. However, this effort collects emblematic songs by Vargas Pinedo, such as "Bailando en la selva" or the one that gives the album its title, in a movido rhythm. The following year, Andrés Vargas decided to make a trip to Lima, whose motive was to collect his royalties and to offer some performances for a company of traditional dance, but mainly the desire to continue his studies at the Instituto Nacional del Ciego [National Institute for the Blind]. By 1971 he had settled permanently in Lima along with Juanita Pérez, La Chamita, his partner since 1963. Then he left the group, who continued to perform with another quena player for a while longer, and then dissolved.

Andrés Vargas had arrived in Lima in the company of Víctor del Águila (violin) and Víctor Matute (drummer) with the intention of joining the aforementioned dance company, which finally did not happen. Taking advantage of the musicians' stay, Andrés suggested to Fredy Centti the idea of joinning him at El Virrey's studio for a recording session, and that's how the first album by Los Pihuichos de la Selva was born, entitled “La Pungara” (the name of an Amazonian ant). The album featured Julio Portugal from Los Mensajeros de Puquio (guitar), Adrián Huamán (second guitar) and a guest musician from the label (guïro). The album appeared in mid-1971. It was an instrumental album and presented a journey through the various Amazonian genres. Highlights include songs such as "La Huayranguita", in the rhythm of cajada, or "Chupizinatay Yacuy" in the rhythm of sitaracuy.

The appearance of "La Pungara" also coincided with the appearance of another album called "Selva", by the group Los Guacamayos, a project directed by Benigno Tafur, a member of the Dúo Loreto, who called on Andrés and other musicians to record an album that included compositions by Vargas Pinedo himself and one by Raúl Llerena “Ranil”. The album was published through the FTA label and, as with Los Pihuichos de la Selva, it was a project for the studio, and they did not perform concerts. By then Andrés was already known in the musical scene as “El flautero de la selva” or “El violinista de la montaña”, and he was often hired to accompany various Andean ensembles. He played violin in the ensembles Juventud Marcabamba, led by Diógenes Rodríguez Moscoso, and San Cristóbal de Huánuco, led by Fernando Calderón. He played quena in Rascila Ramírez Suarez’ group, Los Mensajeros de Puquio, and in Flor de Escarcha. He also composed a song commissioned by Pastorita Huaracina: “Selva Selvita”.

Los Pihuichos de la Selva’s second album was published in 1974, again by El Virrey, and featured Andrés Vargas (quena and violin), Adolfo Zúñiga (percussion), Wilfredo Quintana (presenter) and Juanita Pérez "La Chamita" (vocals). Unlike the first fully instrumental album, this one included songs such as “De dónde vienes loretano”, in pandilla rhythm, and “Flautero de la Montaña”, a ritual dance.

This second work by Los Pihuichos signaled the first appearance on stage of Juanita Pérez, "La Chamita", who went on to become an emblematic presence of the new group directed by Vargas Pinedo, Los Mensajeros de la Selva. From the late 1970s to the late 1990s, this group recorded more than ten albums in cassette format and performed innumerable concerts, with Vargas accompanied on vocals by La Chamita, Amisho del Caynarachi, and the popular Jibarito de la Selva, Andrés Vargas' nephew.

The history of Los Mensajeros de la Selva was intense. However, since 1991 the concerts and royalties decreased, even when their songs began to be performed by many groups in every Amazonian festival there was. Vargas Pinedo looked for different ways to support himself. He became a traveling musician. Since then, every day from 11 in the morning until the end of the afternoon, Andrés Vargas settles in the middle of the huge facade of a well-known shopping center in the seventh block of Las Begonias street, in Lima’s San Isidro district. There he sings his melodies continuously, following in a way the tradition of street performance in Amazonian music, but above all for the sheer necessity of subsistence.

The fifteen tracks gathered in this album are a good introduction to the work of an essential creator of Peruvian music, whose sound expresses the spirit of the Amazonian people and summarizes the transition from tradition to the popular in the context of the emergence of a record industry of Amazonian music. Andrés Vargas constitutes a fundamental basis for the music of the Amazon, as his work synthesizes diverse influences, having that original root as its main motive.

Notes
(1) Lloréns Amico, José: “El Huayno en el dial”, in Música Popular en Lima: Criollos y Andinos, (1983). Instituto de Estudios Peruanos / Instituto Indigenista Interamericano, Lima
(2) Izquierdo Ríos, Francisco: “Breve Historia de la música amazónica”, in Pueblo y Bosque, folklore amazónico (1975) and in Amazonia, folclore, música y canciones de selva y río Javier Isuiza, editor. IIEHAP, 2015
(3) Personal interview with Andrés Vargas Pinedo, October 2020
(4) Reátegui Noriega, Edgar: "Pioneros de la música típica amazónica: los que forjaron la identidad folklórica musical", in Fortalecimiento de la música y danza amazónica para el fomento del turismo cultural en la región Loreto, by Milagros Murrieta Morey. 2008. Bachelor's thesis at the Universidad Amazonía Peruana. Faculty of Economic Sciences and International Business. Iquitos.


*******************

ANDRES VARGAS PINEDO Y LA MÚSICA POPULAR AMAZÓNICA

Andrés Vargas Pinedo es un importante compositor de música popular amazónica de Perú. Es invidente, y se ha destacado como intérprete de la quena y el violín. Nació en la ciudad de Yurimaguas. A lo largo de su trayectoria ha formado e integrado diversos conjuntos de música popular. Esta compilación presenta quince canciones de su autoría, pertenecientes a sus dos primeras agrupaciones: Conjunto Típico Corazón de la selva y Los Pihuichos de la selva, activas entre 1965 y 1974, y que ayudaron a definir el sonido de la música popular amazónica.

A partir de la década del 50 las músicas tradicionales de las diversas regiones del Perú hicieron su ingreso al mundo del disco. Progresivamente, y como consecuencia de un intenso flujo migratorio a la capital, empezó a gestarse en Lima un mercado de música grabada con diversas expresiones musicales folclóricas, las que rápidamente encabezaron la lista de los más vendidos, por amplia diferencia, respecto a otros géneros musicales. Para la década del 70 se contaban cerca de 3 mil títulos publicados de géneros folklóricos. (1) Esto generó no pocas consecuencias dentro de la misma música tradicional, entre las más notorias el hecho de que se pasara de composiciones de autor anónimo, transmitidas vía oral, al surgimiento de compositores y autores con música registrada, y ejecutada por conjuntos profesionales que ahora alcanzaban una gran popularidad a nivel nacional. La música que se tocaba en contextos rurales específicos ahora circulaba a través de registros fono eléctricos y de la radio, adaptándose a los formatos que la industria discográfica determinaba (canciones de 2 o 3 minutos).
Si bien la música andina fue el principal motor de esta nueva industria, hubo también espacio para la difusión de música que venía de la selva.

En el universo de la música tradicional amazónica existe aquella que practican las comunidades nativas con fines rituales y existe también un universo de música tradicional amazónica mestiza que está ligada a las danzas con las que se celebran las festividades como la Fiesta de San Juan, los Carnavales y la Danza de la Humisha, las fiestas patronales que atraen mucho al turismo, bailes masivos llenos de picardía que surgen de forma espontánea y que transforman la calle en un espacio de jolgorio. El sitaracuy (hormiga que muerde) y en especial la pandilla, son las danzas más representativas de la región amazónica (2), pero también encontramos géneros como el movido, la cajada, el chimayche, el changanacuy, el bombo baile, todos asociados a las festividades. Cada danza tiene sus especificidades de acuerdo a la ciudad en la que se practica. La música es interpretada por agrupaciones conformadas casi siempre de una base instrumental de quena o pífano, bombo y redoblante, a veces se suma un clarinete, violín y guitarra. Aunque cada baile tiene sus propias variaciones rítmicas, tienen en común que el bombo marca un ritmo constante, sobre el cual la quena o el pífano desarrolla una línea melódica muy aguda y reiterativa que parece imitar el canto de un pájaro. A veces hay una voz que canta, a veces las voces aparecen lúdicamente como sonidos que identifican el habla popular amazónica o que emulan animales de la selva. Estos bailes los practican los pueblos ribereños y vienen principalmente de la Selva Alta, que limita con la sierra, de ahí que es música que ha recibido una fuerte influencia del mundo andino.

Por otro lado, podemos encontrar en la selva también un desarrollo de músicas populares muy variado que incluye valses, marchas, música infantil, cumbias, rocanrol y también la música que interpretan los conjuntos típicos, los cuales, sobre la base del ensamble tradicional amazónico, y nutridos de influencias musicales provenientes de Brasil (samba), Colombia (cumbia) y Ecuador (sanjuanito), han producido desde los 60s un repertorio musical amazónico nuevo. Agrupaciones como Conjunto típico Corazón de la selva, Los Solteritos, Los Pihuichos de la selva, Los Guacamayos, Conjunto Selva alegre y Conjunto Flor del oriente son los que definieron un sonido para el movimiento de la música popular amazónica, al que luego se sumaron conjuntos como Los Hijos de Lamas, Jibarito y Los Mensajeros de la selva, Los Ribereños del Huallaga, entre otros.

Esta música popular amazónica está ligada a sentimientos de identidad local y narra vivencias relacionadas a las formas de trabajo, la migración, historias de amor y leyendas populares, los paisajes amazónicos y la comida típica.
Andrés Vargas Pinedo ocupa un lugar importante en este universo musical, debido al arraigo de sus composiciones, su singular estilo de tocar la quena y a su calidad de pionero. “Corazón de la selva” el primer LP del Conjunto típico Corazón de la selva, de Andrés Vargas Pinedo, fue publicado por Industrias El Virrey en abril de 1966 y constituye la primera referencia discográfica de esta música popular amazónica.

Andrés Vargas Pinedo nació un 23 de setiembre de 1943 en Yurimaguas, Alto Amazonas, Loreto. Quedó invidente a los tres días de nacido debido a una negligencia médica. Aprendió a tocar la quena a los 9 años, y creció escuchando a Roldán Pinedo, Ángel Carbajal y Juan Eleazer Huanchi “El Yacuruna”, músicos tradicionales que amenizaban las fiestas del pueblo. Con 20 años se mudó a Iquitos y allí formó su primer conjunto musical. La difusión a través de la radio cumplía un rol importante para el impulso de un artista, pasó por “Cantares Amazónicos” de Radio Amazonas, que dirigía Tito Rodríguez Linares “El Shicshi” y por “Cantares de la Selva” en Radio Loreto, que dirigía Raúl Llerena Vásquez (Ranil) y Alejandro Vásquez Pérez. Así fue que su música llegó a un público mayor, incluido los oídos del alcalde, quien los contrató para realizar presentaciones en diversas plazas de la ciudad. Fue entonces que el conjunto consiguió gran aceptación y decidieron probar suerte en Lima. Para entonces ya se llamaban Corazón de la selva, y el grupo lo integraba Andrés Vargas (quena y composición), Horacio Fernández (guitarra), Alberto del Castillo (charango), Horacio Fernández Reátegui (maracas), Roberto Alaba Meléndez (bombo), Gilberto Villacrés Reátegui (primer redoblante), Esteban de la Cruz (segundo redoblante), Palmira y Francisca Camasca Tihuay (primera y segunda voz respectivamente).

Don Andrés sostiene que el nombre Corazón de la selva lo puso Elíseo Reátegui, destacado compositor y líder de Los Solteritos, quien los bautizó así durante la animación de una de sus presentaciones. (3) Por su parte, Víctor del Águila, el notable violinista del segundo álbum del conjunto, sugiere que el nombre lo puso don Manuel Horacio Fernández, quien cierto día, luego de ir en busca de leña, se topó con un tronco de huacapurana, que al primer hachazo hizo brotar un líquido similar a la sangre, y de allí surgió la idea para el nombre del conjunto. (4)

Lo cierto es que Corazón de la selva inició una vertiginosa carrera musical. Gracias al promotor Delfín Linares llegaron a Lima para una presentación en Radio Agricultura, que llegó a oídos de Polidorio García, director de El Virrey, quien les ofreció publicar un disco. A los pocos días estaban grabando su primer álbum, usando el Cine Coloso, en La Victoria, como estudio de grabación. César Zárate, del conjunto andino Los Pacharacos, los apoyó en el violín. En abril de 1966 salió a la venta el LP “Corazón de la selva”, que la disquera presentó como “la síntesis de nuestra selva amazónica” y que incluía doce canciones compuestas por Vargas Pinedo, muchas con una gran influencia de la música andina y de la costa, y otras que parten del sonido tradicional amazónico como “Alegría de la selva”, inspirada en el trinar de un pájaro flautero, en ritmo de movido, “Uchpagallo”, en ritmo de sitaracuy, inspirada en una melodía tradicional, o “Punchacacho tutacacho”, en ritmo de changanacuy, que ya son clásicos de la música selvática.

Tras un año de exitosas giras y conciertos por toda la región amazónica, el conjunto entró a grabar su segundo álbum un 3 de octubre de 1968. El mismo día que el general Juan Velasco Alvarado daba un golpe de Estado, deponiendo al presidente Fernando Belaunde Terry, marcando así el fin de un estado oligarca que había dominado al Perú y dando inicio al Gobierno Revolucionario de las Fuerzas Armadas, que trajo consigo una serie de reformas históricamente pendientes en favor de las grandes mayorías. La política cultural velasquista nacionalista, a través de una serie de decretos de difusión radial, contribuyó en buena medida a la promoción de la música popular autóctona.

“Picaflor Loretano”, el nuevo álbum del Conjunto típico Corazón de la selva se grabó en Iquitos, en el auditorio de Radio Atlántida, con la supervisión de Fredy Centti (director del conjunto Los Pacharacos y responsable del área de folklore de El Virrey) y Raúl Delmar (productor y director artístico de El Virrey). Para este segundo álbum el conjunto estaba integrado por Andrés Vargas Pinedo (quena), Manuel Horacio Fernández (guitarra), Victor del Águila (violín), Gilberto Villacrés (primer redoblante), Esteban de la Cruz (segundo redoblante), Roberto Alaba Meléndez (bombo), Neptalí Angulo (cabaquiña), Fernando Fernández Reátegui (wiro) y Palmira Camasca (voz). Francisca ya no formaba parte del conjunto, aunque apoyó en voces para la grabación. Ese mismo día también en las instalaciones de Radio Atlántida, Eliseo Reátegui y Los Solteritos hacían su segunda grabación “El amanecer de Los Solteritos” para El Virrey.

“Picaflor Loretano” se grabó con algunas dificultades técnicas por lo que el sonido no alcanzó el brillo del álbum debut. Sin embargo, aquí se recogieron canciones emblemáticas de Vargas Pinedo como “Bailando en la selva” o la que da título al álbum, en ritmo de movido. Al año siguiente, Andrés Vargas decidió realizar un viaje a Lima, tenía como motivo el cobro de sus regalías autorales y el ofrecimiento de unas presentaciones para un elenco de danza tradicional, pero principalmente el deseo de continuar sus estudios en el Instituto Nacional del Ciego. Para 1971 se había instalado definitivamente en Lima junto con Juanita Pérez, La Chamita, su compañera desde 1963. Entonces se alejó de la agrupación, quienes siguieron tocando con otro quenista por un tiempo más, para luego disolverse.

Andrés Vargas había llegado a Lima en compañía de Víctor del Águila (violín) y Víctor Matute (redoblante) con la intención de integrarse al mencionado elenco, lo que finalmente no ocurrió. Aprovechando la estadía de los músicos, Andrés le propuso a Fredy Centti ir al estudio de El Virrey a grabar, y así nació el primer álbum de Los Pihuichos de la selva, titulado “La Pungara” (nombre de una hormiga amazónica). El álbum contó con Julio Portugal de Los Mensajeros de Puquio (guitarra), Adrián Huamán (segunda guitarra) y un músico invitado de la disquera (wiro). El álbum apareció a mediados de 1971, fue un álbum instrumental y presentaba un recorrido por los diversos géneros amazónicos, destacándose canciones como “La Huayranguita” a ritmo de cajada o “Chupizinatay Yacuy” a ritmo de sitaracuy.

La aparición de “La Pungara” coincidió también con la aparición de otro álbum llamado “Selva”, del conjunto Los Guacamayos, un proyecto dirigido por Benigno Tafur, integrante del Dúo Loreto, quien convocó a Andrés y otros músicos para grabar un álbum que incluía composiciones del propio Vargas Pinedo y una de Raúl Llerena “Ranil”. El álbum se publicó a través de la disquera FTA y al igual que con Los Pihuichos de la Selva se trató de un proyecto para la grabación y no realizaron conciertos. Para entonces Andrés ya era conocido en el ambiente musical como “El flautero de la selva” o “El violinista de la montaña”, y solían contratarlo para acompañar a diversos conjuntos andinos. Tocó violín en los conjuntos Juventud Marcabamba de Diógenes Rodríguez Moscoso y San Cristóbal de Huánuco de Fernando Calderón. Y quena en Los Mensajeros de Puquio, de Rascila Ramírez Suarez, Flor de Escarcha. Compuso también un tema por encargo para la Pastorita Huaracina: “Selva Selvita”.

El segundo álbum de Los Pihuichos de la selva se publicó en 1974, nuevamente para El Virrey y contó con la participación de Andrés Vargas (quena y violín), Adolfo Zúñiga (percusión), Wilfredo Quintana (animación) y Juanita Pérez “La Chamita” (voz). A diferencia del primer álbum totalmente instrumental, este incluyó temas cantados como “De dónde vienes loretano” en ritmo de pandilla y “Flautero de la montaña”, una danza ritual.

Este segundo trabajo de Los Pihuichos marcará la aparición en escena de Juanita Pérez, “La Chamita”, quien será una presencia indesligable del nuevo conjunto dirigido por Vargas Pinedo, Los Mensajeros de la selva, con el que desde fines del 70 y hasta fines del 90 grabó más de diez producciones en formato de casete y realizó innumerables conciertos, acompañado en voz por La Chamita, el Amisho del Caynarachi, y el popular Jibarito de la selva, sobrino de Andrés Vargas.

La trayectoria de Los Mensajeros de la selva fue intensa. Sin embargo, desde 1991 los conciertos y las regalías fueron disminuyendo, aun cuando sus canciones empezaron a ser interpretadas por muchos conjuntos en cuanta festividad amazónica hubiera. Vargas Pinedo buscó diversas formas de mantenerse. Fue así que se convirtió en un músico ambulante. Desde entonces todos los días desde las 11 de la mañana hasta finalizar la tarde, Andrés Vargas se instala en medio de la enorme fachada de un conocido centro comercial de la cuadra siete de la calle Las Begonias, en el distrito de San Isidro. Allí entona sus melodías de forma continua, un poco siguiendo la tradición callejera de la música amazónica, pero ante todo por la pura necesidad de subsistencia.

Los quince temas reunidos en este álbum son una buena introducción a la obra de un creador esencial para la música peruana, cuyo sonido expresa el espíritu del pueblo amazónico y resume ese paso de la tradición hacia lo popular en el contexto del surgimiento de una industria discográfica de las músicas populares amazónicas. Andrés Vargas constituye una base fundamental para la música de la Amazonía, es música que sintetiza influencias diversas teniendo esa raíz originaria como su principal motivo.
Notas

(1) Lloréns Amico, José: “El Huayno en el dial”, incluido en Música Popular en Lima: Criollos y Andinos, (1983). Instituto de Estudios Peruanos / Instituto Indigenista Interamericano, Lima
(2) Izquierdo Ríos, Francisco: “Breve Historia de la música amazónica”, incluido en Pueblo y Bosque, folklore amazónico (1975) y en Amazonia, folclore, música y canciones de selva y río Javier Isuiza, editor. IIEHAP, 2015
(3) Entrevista personal Andrés Vargas Pinedo, octubre 2020
(4) Reátegui Noriega, Edgar: "Pioneros de la música típica amazónica: los que forjaron la identidad folklórica musical", en Fortalecimiento de la música y danza amazónica para el fomento del turismo cultural en la región Loreto, de Milagros Murrieta Morey. 2008. Tesis de Licenciatura Universidad Amazonía Peruana. Facultad Ciencias Económicas y Negocios Internacionales. Iquitos.

credits

released April 1, 2021

The fabulous sound of Andrés Vargas Pinedo
A collection of Amazonian popular music (1966-1974)

LADO A
1.-Conjunto típico Corazón de la selva - Alegría en la Selva (2:48)
(Movido Típico)
2.-Los Pihuichos de la selva - La carachama coqueta (2:46)
(Movido Típico)
3.-Los Pihuichos de la selva - Chupizinatay Yacui (2:37)
(Sitaracuy)
4.-Los Pihuichos de la selva - Shamuy Pacarina (2:32)
(Changanacuy)
5.-Los Pihuichos de la selva – El montañés (2:42)
(Marinera selvática)
6.-Los Pihuichos de la selva - El Huancahui (2:38)
(Danza de adoración)
7.-Los Pihuichos de la selva - Flautero de la montaña (2:38)
(Danza ritual)
8.-Los Pihuichos de la selva - El Jornalero (2:30)
(Movido Típico)

LADO B
1.-Los Pihuichos de la selva – La danza del trapichero (2:32)
(Cajada)
2.-Conjunto típico Corazón de la selva - Picaflor loretano (2:32)
(Movido Típico)
3.-Conjunto típico Corazón de la selva - Ushpagallo (2:56)
(Sitaracuy)
4.-Conjunto típico Corazón de la selva - Punchacacho Tutacacho (2:49)
(Changanacuy)
5.-Los Pihuichos de la selva – De dónde vienes loretano (3:11)
(Pandilla)
6.-Conjunto típico Corazón de la selva – Bailando en la selva (3:04)
(Movido Típico)
7.-Los Pihuichos de la selva - La Huayranguita (2:35)
(Sitaracuy)

A1, B3, B4 from Corazón de la Selva (1966, VIR-541)
A2, A5, A7, A8, B1, B5 from Los Pihuichos de la Selva (1974, VIR-867)
A3, A4, A6, B7 from La Pungara (1971, VIR-759)
B2, B6 from Picaflor Loretana (1968, VIR-655)

Compiled by Luis Alvarado
All songs written by Andrés Vargas Pinedo
Mastered by Alberto Cendra at Garden Lab Audio
Liner notes by Luis Alvarado
Translation and proofreading: Alonso Almenara
Artwork by Jordy García (Posters Blumoo)

BR147LP

Mas:
Alrededor de la Húmisha: la música los conjuntos típicos amazónicos LP
buhrecords.bandcamp.com/album/alrededor-de-la-h-misha-la-m-sica-de-los-conjuntos-t-picos-amaz-nicos-de-per

La música de los Kechwas lamistas: Registros sonoros de comunidades nativas de Lamas LP
buhrecords.bandcamp.com/album/la-m-sica-de-los-kechwas-lamistas-registros-sonoros-de-comunidades-nativas-de-lamas

license

all rights reserved

tags

about

Buh Records Lima, Peru

Buh Records is an independent label based in Lima, Peru, focused in experimental music and new sounds. Run by Luis Alvarado.

contact / help

Contact Buh Records

Streaming and
Download help

Redeem code

Report this album or account

If you like El fabuloso sonido de Andrés Vargas Pinedo: una colección de música popular amazónica (1966-1974), you may also like: